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Notebook 2017

Editor Ines Tolic

Index

  • Alberto Malfitano, Fashion and the Nation: The Case of Lidel, 1919-1935
  • Gianluigi Di Giangirolamo, The Development of Fashion Institutions in Italy Involving Both Private and Public Sectors (1945-1962)
  • Chiara Pompa, Diaries Without Padlocks. Photographic Writing of the Obscene in Social Networks, Art and Fashion
  • Alessandra Olivares, Contemporary Metamorphoses: Bodies and Identities in the Era of Technological Culture
  • Giampaolo Proni, Talking to Oneself. A Semiotic Analysis of Donald Trump’s Hair Style

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The third issue of The Culture, Fashion, and Society Notebook contains five monographic essays that deal with important topics related to the world of fashion, art and contemporary culture, adopting hybridmand original disciplinary approaches.

The first essay, entitled “Fashion and the Nation: The Case of Lidel, 1919-1935”, was written by Alberto Malfitano and is about the magazine Lidel. Founded by Lydia De Liguoro in 1919, the periodical fervently supported the birth of an Italian fashion, perfectly aligned with the post-war climate of patriotic exaltation, from its first issue presenting itself as a point of reference for the middle and upper classes eager to be up to date on the latest trends in fashion, luxury and elegance. Lidel, published in Italy between 1919 and 1935, soon became one of the most important women’s magazines in the country. Studying the magazine’s key role in promoting an all-Italian fashion, the essay by Malfitano, Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Bologna, retraces its emblematic history.

The essay by Gianluigi Di Giangirolamo entitled “The Development of Fashion Institutions in Italy Involving Both Private and Public Sectors (1945-1962)” investigates the process of institutionalising Italian fashion during the 20th century. Using as sources documents stored in the Central state archive in Rome, the scholar traces the historical path that ultimately led to the birth of the National chamber for Italian fashion, an association that still today governs, coordinates and promotes the development of the sector in Italy. As well illustrated by Di Giangirolamo, research fellow in Contemporary History at the Department for Life Quality Studies of the University of Bologna, the process that led to the birth of the National chamber for Italian fashion represents the outcome of a complex economic, social, cultural and political journey that paralleled the development of the modern capitals of Italian fashion in the second post-war period.

With her contribution entitled “Diaries Without Padlocks. Photographic Writing of the Obscene in Social Networks, Art and Fashion”, Chiara Pompa, Ph.D. in the Department of Arts at the University of Bologna, studies a contemporary setting, investigating the consequences of communication technology and the prominence of the Internet as a channel for the distribution of images. According to the scholar, the configuration of a “transparency society”, recently theorised by Byung-Chul Han, as well as its consequences, deserve a thorough reflection carried out by intersecting stimuli from social networks, the art world and fashion. The author’s ultimate goal is to provide tools to better understand the poetics of photography and the so-called “brothel without walls” predicted by Marshall McLuhan in the 1960s.

Alessandra Olivares, a recent doctoral graduate from the Department of Arts at the University of Bologna, studies the work of contemporary artists like Micha Klein, Erwin Olaf and Marco Bolognesi with the aim of analysing the effects that technology has on the idea of a human body. Her essay, entitled “Contemporary Metamorphoses: Bodies and Identities in the Era of Technological Culture”, analyses bodies modified through the use of computer technology creating works in which what counts does not seem to be the ultimate result, or even its aesthetic value, but the morphing process itself that made these alterations possible.

Finally, the essay by Giampaolo Proni, Professor of Semiotics in the Department for Life Quality Studies at the University of Bologna, identifies semiotic tools and pathways that explain Donald Trump’s hair, a subject that has long been a source of curiosity and media interest, but that with the election of Trump as President of the United States of America has attracted renewed interest. Specifically, “Talking to Oneself. A Semiotic Analysis of Donald Trump’s Hair Style” invites the reader to consider Trump’s hairstyle first and foremost as an idiolect, an individual language, or rather a linguistic system of a community that is unique to every single speaker, and that on a metasemiotic level can be considered a form of self-presentation autism.

See also

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Notebook 2016
Editor Roy Menarini
Notebook 2015
Editor Federica Muzzarelli
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